Sundried Tomato Bread

Sundried Tomato Bread perfect packed up for warm summer picnics, or sliced and toasted with melting cheese on a chilly Winter’s eve.

Sundried Tomato Bread
Flavourful Sundried Tomato Bread

I have been wanting to try my hand at Sundried Tomato Bread for literally ages, somehow though it always seemed to get put off.

Well not this weekend! I set about creating this beautifully coloured and delicious loaf on Saturday morning. I started with my Farmhouse White Loaf recipe and went from there.

Sundried Tomato Bread with cheese
Good sharp cheddar and vine tomatoes compliment this Sundried Tomato Bread beautifully.

Sundried tomatoes are usually available either stored in oil, or dry packed in a cellophane bag. Mine were the latter and I had a hunch they would be too dry for this recipe. So I chopped them up and warmed them gently in some olive oil. I’m pretty sure this step is what gave the crust a delicious chewy texture, rather than crisp and crunchy,

To add extra flavour some smoked paprika was added to the dough, oh boy this makes such a difference to the flavour. A very subtle, smokey – you know something’s there but you can’t quite put your finger on it – flavour, that compliments the slight sweetness of the sundried tomatoes.

Chewy Crust Sundried Tomato Bread
Sundried Tomato Bread the colour alone is so inviting.

This bread can stand up to strong flavours and would be the perfect accompaniment to game pate, sharp cheddar, or torn into chunks and used to mop up a spicy soup. Ooh mulligatawny soup would pare beautifully with this bread.

I am a firm believer that bread should add to the taste, not just be a carrier of flavour from whatever it is topped with. This Sundried Tomato Bread ticks that box one hundred per cent. Adding another level to a cheese and chutney sandwich. The flavours coming alive when warmed and toasted with melting cheese dripping over the sides.

Flavourful Sundried Tomato Bread
Sundried Tomatoe Bread adding another flavour dimension to sandwiches.

Sundried Tomato Bread is a total knockout on the flavour front.

Recipe: Makes one Sundried Tomato Bread

500g/1lb 2oz Strong White Bread Flour – I use Organic White Bread Flour from Shipton Mill

320ml Tepid Water

7g/1 sachet Fast Action Dried Yeast

1tsp Smoked Paprika

100g/4oz Sundried Tomatoes plus 2 tbsp oil that they come in or 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

7g Salt – I use Maldon Sea Salt Flakes

Method:

Chop the sundried tomatoes in to fairly small pieces. If they did not come packaged in oil, add to a small saucepan and pour over 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Warm over a medium heat for 2 minutes, the sundried tomatoes will soak up the oil. Set to one side to cool.

The ‘bowl’ is either the container used for mixing/proving and baking in a bread maker, or the bowl of a stand mixer.

For both methods:

Pour the water into the bowl, then add the yeast.

Add the flour on top of the liquid.

Add the salt and smoked paprika.

If using a bread maker, set to dough cycle and start the program. When prompted by the machine, or 5 minutes prior to the mixing finishing, add the sundried tomatoes and oil.

Once the dough cycle is complete re-start for 2 minutes. This ‘knocks back’ the dough. Remove the dough and place on a lightly floured surface, it will be quite sticky.

Flatten the dough with your hand into a rough rectangular shape. Fold the bottom third upwards and then the top third downwards, like an envelope.

Sundried Tomato Bread dough
Look at the gorgeous colour of the dough.

*Place the log shaped dough onto the baking tray, cut a couple of slashes through the dough diagonally and dust with a little flour. Cover with a clean, dry tea towel and leave in a draught free place until doubled in size – approx 1 hour.

If using a stand mixer, attach the dough hook and mix on medium speed until all the ingredients are combined. Add the sundried tomatoes and oil. Continue to mix for a further 5 minutes, until the dough is smooth and elastic.

Stop mixing. Scrape the dough from the dough hook and combine with the dough in the bowl. Form into a ball, place back into the bowl. Cover with a damp cloth and leave in a draught free place until doubled in size (approx. 1hour).

Once doubled remove the cloth, mix for 2 minutes on medium speed using the dough hook. This ‘knocks back’ the dough.

Flatten the dough with your hand into a rough rectangular shape. Fold the bottom third upwards and then the top third downwards, like an envelope.

*Follow as above.

Risen Sundried Tomato Bread
Beautifully risen and ready for the oven – Sundried Tomato Bread.

Approx. 10 minutes before the loaf is ready, preheat the oven to 220C/200C fan.

Once the dough has doubled in size place into the middle of the preheat, hot oven.

Bake for 30 minutes. The bread is baked when it has a good firm crust and sounds hollow when rapped on the bottom with your knuckle.

Once the Sundried Tomato Bread is baked, remove from the oven and place on a cooling rack immediately.

I know you want to tear into this loaf as soon as it is out of the oven, I know you do, cos I do too. Please leave the loaf to cool, ideally until cold, but just warm should be ok too!!

Whole loaf Sundried Tomato Bread
Sundried Tomato Bread there’s a good chewy crust on this loaf.

This bread is made for feasting. Imagine, cheeseboard on the table, steaming bowls of spicy soup and thick chunks of this savoury, slightly malted flavoured bread. Oh and all your friends and/or family sitting around chatting, dunking, eating and having fun. Who said there’s no feast without bread eh?

Yummy Sundried Tomato Bread
Sundried Tomato Bread perfect for an indoors or outdoors picnic.

Actually this bread has a sourdough, chewy quality to it, with a few larger holes throughout the loaf and a hint of that unique soughdough flavour.

If you enjoy bread packed with flavour, then this Sundried Tomato Bread is definitely a loaf you should try. Please let me know if you do bake it? I love hearing how your bakes turn out,

If you have enjoyed this Sundried Tomato Bread recipe then you are going to love these other bread recipes:

Large White Bloomer

Wholemeal Cob Loaf

Knotted Popyseed Rolls

Whatever you bake and whoever you bake for, have fun!

Sammie xx

Any questions? You can leave a comment or contact me via Twitter @sammiefeasting (also Pinterest and Intagram handles).

 

Share This Facebooktwittergoogle_plustumblr

Large White Bloomer

Hello and thank you for stopping by. I’m so excited to share my recipe for a Large White Bloomer today. This loaf is easy to make and even easier to eat!!

I was inspired to make this Large White Bloomer by a loaf I saw on Twitter. Ooh it looked good and I knew I had to try and make my own loaf. I’m so glad I did and in true feastingisfun style I’m sharing the recipe with you!

Large White Bloomer fantastic bread - made to share www.feastingisfun.com
Large White Bloomer fantastic bread – made to share www.feastingisfun.com

 

Now you may wonder why you should make your own bread? Most supermarkets sell freshly baked bread and most high streets still have a bakery. I can honestly say that nothing beats the taste and smell of fresh, homemade bread. You know exactly what has gone into your loaf? Have you looked at the ingredient list on plastic wrapped bread lately? Even supermarket bakery bread can contain flavour enhancers, flour improvers and all manner of other unwanted additives.

Ok so you’re not bothered by the additives in bread. What about the cost?? My Large White Bloomer is made with organic, stone ground flour and costs no more than £1.00 to make!! Have I got your attention??

 

Large White Bloomer www.feastingisfun.com
Large White Bloomer www.feastingisfun.com

 

We are a family of five and we get through a lot of bread. It is simply too cost effective for me NOT to make our own bread. No we don’t eat all organic food. Yes I do occaisionally buy bread – and everytime I do it reminds me why I bake my own. It takes very little time, especially if you use a bread maker or stand mixer to do the kneading/mixing part for you. Even if you knead by hand, double up on this recipe, pop one loaf in the freezer and timewise you’re quids in.

Have I convinced you?? What I love about this Large White Bloomer is, the only piece of baking equipment you need is a baking tray. Which will also enable you to bake my Wholemeal Cob Loaf.

Recipe : Makes 1 Large White Bloomer

380ml/14 fl oz Warm Water – body temp.

3tsp/1.5 Sachet Dried Easy Bake Yeast – I used Allinson

2tsp Honey

675g/1.5lb Strong Plain White Flour, plus extra for dusting and rolling

1.5tsp Salt – I use Maldon Sea Salt

25g/1oz Unsalted Butter

Method :

Note : if making by hand, knead the dough for 10-15 minutes before proving. The dough will be sticky to start but continue kneading and it will transform into a soft, pliable dough.

The ‘bowl’ refers to a large bowl for hand mixing, a stand mixer bowl, or a bread maker pan.

Place the water into a bowl. Add the yeast and honey. Use your clean fingers to swish and mix everything together.

Add the flour. On top add the salt and butter.

In all methods stir the ingredients with the end of a wooden spoon 10 times.

Set your bread maker to dough cycle and start.

Attach a dough hook to a stand mixer. Mix on low – medium speed for 15 minutes. Stop the mixer, clean the dough off of the hook, form into a ball, place back into the bowl and cover with a damp cloth. Leave in a draught free place until doubled in size.

If mixing by hand bring all the ingredients together using one hand and proceed as above for kneading. Form the dough into a ball, place into a bowl and proceed as for stand mixer.

When the dough cycle is complete, restart the mixing cycle on your bread maker. Allow to mix and knock back your dough for 5 minutes. Follow instructions with the photographs.

For stand mixer or hand mixed dough, once the dough is doubled in size, punch down into the bowl to knock back the dough. Hand knead the dough on a lightly floured surface for 5 – 10 minutes until the dough is elastic and smooth.

Whichever method you use, once the dough has been knocked back and mixed or kneaded, place on a lightly floured surface.

On a floured surface form the dough into a ball.
On a floured surface form the dough into a ball.
Roll the dough out until it is 2.5cm/1" thick.
Roll the dough out until it is 2.5cm/1″ thick.
Fold the top third, like an envelope.
Fold the top third, like an envelope.
Fold the bottom third up and over the top third.
Fold the bottom third up and over the top third.
Turn the dough over, you should have a lovely bloomer shape. Place on a greased baking tray.
Turn the dough over, you should have a lovely bloomer shape. Place on a greased baking tray.
Using a sharp knife cut 4-5 slashes across the dough.
Using a sharp knife cut 4-5 slashes across the dough.
Dust the loaf with flour.
Dust the loaf with flour.

 

I actually used the excess flour from the worktop to dust my loaf with – waste not want not!!

Cover the loaf with a clean , dry cloth and leave again in a draught free place until doubled in size, mine took 45 minutes on a warm day, don’t worry if it takes longer. Actually the longer bread takes to rise (prove) the deeper the flavour.

15 minutes before your loaf is ready to bake, place a tray/grill pan in the bottom of the oven and fill with water. Preheat your oven to its hottest setting- mine is 250C.

When your loaf is doubled in size remove the towel.

Large White Bloomer ready for the oven.
Large White Bloomer ready for the oven.

 

 

Place your loaf in the middle of the preheated, steamy oven, turn the heat down immediately to 225C and bake for 20 – 30 minutes depending on how dark you like your crust. My loaf was baked for 25 minutes.

When golden and crusty remove your Large White Bloomer from the oven.

Carefully – it’s hot – turn the loaf over and rap your knuckle against the base. The bread is baked if you hear a hollow sound.

Large White Bloomer a gorgeous, golden loaf.
Large White Bloomer a gorgeous, golden loaf.

 

 

Transfer your bread to a cooling rack – this will avoid it getting a soggy bottom. Breathe in deeply. Remember this smell. This is the wonderful smell of your homemade bread. You can’t buy that!!

Large White Bloomer leave to cool on a cooling rack.
Large White Bloomer leave to cool on a cooling rack.

 

 

Although it is so tempting to slice straight into your loaf, it’s better to leave it to cool completely as it will slice better. If you can’t resist tearing a chunk off go ahead!! It might be a good idea to bake another loaf, as warm bread is addictive and easily snaffled!!!

Large White Bloomer golden crust, white crumb delicious www.feastingisfun.com
Large White Bloomer golden crust, white crumb delicious www.feastingisfun.com

 

When I make bread for people as a gift (and I use the word make in it’s loosest term as my bread maker does the hard stuff!) it always receives a rapturous welcome. Actually out of everything I bake it is probably the MOST appreciated.

Large White Bloomer homemade bread is the BEST! www.feastingisfun.com
Large White Bloomer homemade bread is the BEST! www.feastingisfun.com

 

 

If you make this loaf I’d love to see it. Find me on Twitter @sammiefeasting.

Do you share your baking? If so, who with?

Sammie x

 

 

Share This Facebooktwittergoogle_plustumblr